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Code of ethics and standards of practice for registered early childhood educators in Ontario

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July 1, 2017
Author: 
College of Early Childhood Educators
Publication Date: 
1 Jun 2017
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Introduction

The College of Early Childhood Educators (the College) regulates and governs Ontario’s registered early childhood educators (RECEs) in the public interest. The College establishes and maintains:

• registration requirements
• ethical and professional standards for RECEs
• requirements for continuous professional learning
• a complaints and discipline process for professional misconduct or incompetence
• a fitness to practise process for issues of incapacity.

The College of Early Childhood Educators (the College) regulates and governs Ontario’s registered early childhood educators (RECEs) in the public interest. The College establishes and maintains:

• registration requirements
• ethical and professional standards for RECEs
• requirements for continuous professional learning
• a complaints and discipline process for professional misconduct or incompetence
• a fitness to practise process for issues of incapacity

The Early Childhood Educators Act, 2007 (the ECE Act) defines the practice of early childhood education as, “the planning and delivery of inclusive play-based learning and care programs for children in order to promote the well-being and holistic development of children, and includes,

(a) the delivery of programs to children 12 years or younger;
(b) the assessment of the programs and of the progress of children in the programs;
(c) communication with parents or persons with legal custody of the children in the programs in order to improve the development of the children; and
(d) such other services or activities as may be prescribed by the regulations".

The ECE Act protects the public interest and the integrity of the early childhood education profession by stipulating that “no person shall engage in the practice of early childhood education or hold himself or herself out as able to do so unless the person holds a certificate of registration issued under this Act”.

The professional practice of RECEs is not restricted to the definition within the Act. RECEs may have additional experience or qualifications that enable them to work in a variety of roles and settings. Not all RECEs work directly with children, but nevertheless impact children, families and the profession through administrative or leadership roles in the early learning and child care sector.

The Practice of Early Childhood Education

RECEs work in diverse roles and settings, including but not limited to:

• Licensed child care (e.g.centre-based, home-based child care)
• Unlicensed child care (e.g.unlicensed home-based child care, nanny, childminding services)
• Family support programs (e.g.child and family resource centres)
• Children's services (e.g.special needs resourcing, children's mental health, children's treatment centre, child welfare)
• Education (e.g. public or private school, school board)
• Pre-service or in-service education and training (e.g. post-secondary institution, professional resource centre, professional training, consultant)
• Government (e.g.First Nation, provincial or municipal government, policy, licensing, administration)
• Advocacy (e.g.professional association, union, network).

RECEs who do not work directly with children should think broadly about how their work and roles in the sector meet the expectations in the Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice. They should reflect on how their education and training in early childhood education influences their decision making and how their specific roles support the practice of other RECEs and promotes high quality early childhood education.

The Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice sets out the professional knowledge, skills, values and expectations applicable to all RECEs regardless of role and the setting in which they may practise. As regulated professionals, RECEs are expected to act with integrity at all times within their workplace and the community.

-reprinted from the College of Early Childhood Educators

report
Entered Date: 
21 Jun 2017
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