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Early childhood development activities and expenditures/ Early learning and child care activities and expenditures 2003-2004

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Government of Canada reports
Author: 
Social Development Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and Northern Affairs Canada
Publication Date: 
28 Feb 2005
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Excerpts from the press release:

The Early Childhood Development Activities and Expenditures:

Government of Canada Report 2003-2004 is an updated progress report on activities and expenditures undertaken by the federal government in support of young children and their families since it began implementing the September 2000 federal/provincial/territorial Early Childhood Development Agreement. It describes dozens of programs and services for young children and families that are designed and delivered by the Government of Canada including Maternity and Parental Benefits, the Child Care Expense Deduction, the Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program, the Community Action Program for Children, and the Federal Strategy on Early Childhood Development for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children.

The Early Childhood Development Agreement enables federal, provincial, and territorial governments to enhance programs and services for children under six and their families in any or all of four key areas, including:

- promoting healthy pregnancy, birth, and infancy;
- improving parenting and family supports;
- strengthening early childhood development, learning and care; and
- strengthening community supports.

Under the 2000 Early Childhood Development Agreement, the Government of Canada is transferring a total of $3.2 billion between 2001 and 2008 to provinces and territories to support their investments in early childhood development programs and services. In 2003-2004 the amount transferred was $500 million.

Under the 2002 Federal Strategy on Early Childhood Development for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children, which goes hand in hand with the Early Childhood Development Agreement, additional funding of $320 million over five years is provided to enhance programs and services that address the early childhood development needs of Aboriginal children.

Specifically, the additional funding will provide for work in four areas of activity:

- new investments to enhance existing programs (Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities, Aboriginal Head Start On Reserve, and the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative) and to intensify efforts to address Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder in First Nations communities;
- advancing research and knowledge;
- building capacity and networks; and
- working toward better integration of federal early childhood development programs and services.

The Early Learning and Child Care Activities and Expenditures:

Government of Canada Report 2003-2004 responds to the public reporting commitments under the 2003 Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care. It describes early learning and child care programs and services that are designed and delivered by Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, and National Defence, including the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative, Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities, and Child/Day-care Program &emdash; Ontario.

The Multilateral Framework enables federal, provincial, and territorial governments to further promote early childhood development and helps parents participate in employment or training opportunities by improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services.

Under the 2003 Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care, the Government of Canada is transferring a total of $1.05 billion over five years in support of provincial and territorial investments in early learning and child care. In 2003-2004 the amount transferred was $25 million.

government document
Entered Date: 
18 Mar 2005
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